What is my marital status according to the CRA? - Community

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What is my marital status according to the CRA?

The Canada Revenue Agency’s idea of your marital status might differ from how you see it. When entering your marital status in TurboTax, make sure your entry matches CRA’s definition.

This is how CRA understands the various marital statuses:

  • Married: You’re legally married.
  • Common-law: You live with a person with whom you have a conjugal relationship and at least one of the following conditions is met:
    • You’ve lived with the person in a conjugal relationship for at least 12 consecutive months;
    • The person is the parent of your child by birth or legal adoption; or
    • The person has custody and control of your child (or did immediately before the child turned 19), and your child is wholly dependent on that person for support (i.e., your child does not depend on you for support).
  • Widowed: Your spouse died and you have not remarried or entered into a common-law relationship.
  • Divorced: You are legally divorced and you have not remarried or entered into a common-law relationship.
  • Separated:
    • You’re legally married but you’ve been living apart from your spouse for any period of time due to a breakdown in the relationship.
    • You were living common-law but you’ve been living apart from your partner for at least 90 consecutive days due to a breakdown in the relationship. Alternatively, you may choose “Single”. There are no tax implications whether you choose “Separated” or “Single” after the breakup of a common-law relationship.
    • If you’ve been living apart for reasons other than a breakdown in the relationship (for example, for school or work, or to receive medical treatment), you are still considered married or common-law.
  • Single:
    • You’re not currently married and have never been married.
    • You were living common-law but you’ve been living apart from your partner for at least 90 consecutive days due to a breakdown in the relationship. There are no tax implications whether you choose “Separated” or “Single” after the breakup of a common-law relationship.

 

 

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