Family and health topics https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/02/168 Family and health topics Wed, 30 Sep 2020 17:39:39 GMT 168 2020-09-30T17:39:39Z Can I claim my spouse or common-law partner as my dependent? https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/can-i-claim-my-spouse-or-common-law-partner-as-my-dependent/01/873442#M25 Your spouse or common-law partner cannot be claimed as your dependent. However, if you supported your spouse or common-law partner at any time during the year, and they have a low income, you may be able to claim the Spouse or common-law partner (SCP) amount.       TurboTax automatically calculates the SCP when you enter your marital status and complete your spouse’s personal information section.       Unused tax credits from the lower income spouse may also be transferred to the other if needed to reduce taxes. The CRA website provides more information. Related information: What do I do if I don't know my spouse's income? I’m separated or divorced. Why am I being asked for info about my former spouse/partner? How do I change my marital status in online editions of TurboTax? Why won’t TurboTax let me change my marital status to single? Frequently asked questions about marital status and filing your taxes Thu, 10 Sep 2020 10:55:49 GMT https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/can-i-claim-my-spouse-or-common-law-partner-as-my-dependent/01/873442#M25 TurboTax Support 2020-09-10T10:55:49Z Can I claim the eligible dependant credit for more than one child? https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/can-i-claim-the-eligible-dependant-credit-for-more-than-one-child/01/873486#M24 No. The tax credit for an eligible dependant can only be claimed once. Each household is allowed only one claim for this amount, even if there is more than one dependant in the household. You should enter all your children and other dependants when preparing your tax return to claim other dependant benefits that may be available. Related information Who can claim the tax credit for an eligible dependant? Thu, 10 Sep 2020 10:57:18 GMT https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/can-i-claim-the-eligible-dependant-credit-for-more-than-one-child/01/873486#M24 TurboTax Support 2020-09-10T10:57:18Z What is the Family Caregiver Amount? https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-family-caregiver-amount/01/873490#M23 As of tax year 2017, Canada Revenue Agency has discontinued the Family Caregiver Amount (FCA) as a separate credit on your tax return. Instead, you can claim the Canada Caregiver Credit (CCC), a new credit that consolidates the Caregiver Amount, the Amount for Infirm Dependants 18 and older, and the Family Caregiver Amount. However, you can still claim the Family Caregiver Amount on previous years’ tax returns. For tax year 2016 and earlier, the FCA is a non-refundable tax credit you can claim if you cared for a dependant with an impairment in physical or mental functions. The dependant must have lived with you in order to be eligible. You can claim one FCA for each eligible dependant. Eligibility criteria vary based on the dependant’s age: To claim the FCA for dependants over 18, you must also be claiming at least one of the following credits on the same return: Spouse or common-law partner amount Amount for an eligible dependent Caregiver Amount You can claim the FCA for dependants under 18 as a stand-alone credit. The child’s impairment must be prolonged and indefinite, and the child must have been dependent on you for assistance with personal needs and care as compared to children of the same age. Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) may require you to provide a signed statement fr... Thu, 10 Sep 2020 10:57:24 GMT https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-family-caregiver-amount/01/873490#M23 TurboTax Support 2020-09-10T10:57:24Z How does my income affect how much I can deduct for medical expenses? https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/how-does-my-income-affect-how-much-i-can-deduct-for-medical-expenses/01/873498#M22 Your net income—not your total gross income—affects the amount of medical expenses you can claim as a credit. You can claim the total amount of eligible medical expenses minus $2,352* or 3% of your net income, whichever amount is smaller. For example: Your net income is $25,000 for the year. Your medical expenses add up to $840. You can claim $840 minus $2,352 or 3% of your net income, whichever amount is smaller. 3% of your net income ($25,000) is $750. This amount is smaller than $2,352 so this is the amount we’ll use for our calculations. So you can claim $840 - $750 = $90 as a credit. If your total medical expenses are less than 3% of your net income, they can’t be applied as credits. Note: Only expenses, or portions of expenses, that haven’t been reimbursed to you can be included as medical expenses for income tax purposes. *This amount is for the 2019 tax year.  Related information How do I enter my medical expenses? What medical expenses can I claim? How do I choose a claim period for medical expenses? Eligible medical expenses you can claim on your tax return (source: CRA) Thu, 10 Sep 2020 10:57:35 GMT https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/how-does-my-income-affect-how-much-i-can-deduct-for-medical-expenses/01/873498#M22 TurboTax Support 2020-09-10T10:57:35Z Can I claim medical expenses that I paid for a dependant who is not my minor child? https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/can-i-claim-medical-expenses-that-i-paid-for-a-dependant-who-is-not-my-minor-child/01/873508#M21 Yes. You can claim eligible medical expenses that you paid for your or your spouse/partner's child over 18, parent, grandparent, brother, sister, aunt, uncle, niece, or nephew. In order to be eligible, the dependant must have depended on you for support and lived with you during the tax year, or have been a resident of Canada during the tax year. The residency condition does not apply if the dependant was your or your spouse or common-law partner's child or grandchild. Related Information What medical expenses can I claim? Where do I enter my medical expenses? Where do I enter medical expenses for dependants over 18 years of age? Thu, 10 Sep 2020 10:57:54 GMT https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/can-i-claim-medical-expenses-that-i-paid-for-a-dependant-who-is-not-my-minor-child/01/873508#M21 TurboTax Support 2020-09-10T10:57:54Z Can I claim prior year medical expenses? https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/can-i-claim-prior-year-medical-expenses/01/873510#M20 Yes, you can claim any eligible medical expenses if they occurred in a 12-month period that ends in the current tax year. After you enter your medical expenses, TurboTax will prompt you to choose your 12-month claim period. For example, the oldest medical expense that you can claim on your 2018 return is an expense from January 2, 2017, using a claim period of January 2, 2017, to January 1, 2018. If you have a large amount of expenses in the latter part of the tax year, it might be better to save them and claim them with medical expenses you have in the early part of the following tax year. For example, if most of your medical expenses occurred after May 15, 2018, you can save them for your 2019 tax return. At that time you can use a 12-month period of May 15, 2018 to May 14, 2019, and claim all expenses that fall within that period. You can use a different 12-month period each year; your 12-month period doesn’t have to start where your previous 12-month period ended. However, you cannot claim the same expenses more than once. Related Information How do I choose a claim period for medical expenses? Thu, 10 Sep 2020 10:57:57 GMT https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/can-i-claim-prior-year-medical-expenses/01/873510#M20 TurboTax Support 2020-09-10T10:57:57Z Why does my spouse's income lower my refund amount? https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/why-does-my-spouse-s-income-lower-my-refund-amount/01/873520#M19 Your refund likely dropped due to the calculation of the Spouse or common-law partner amount. The Spouse or common-law partner amount is calculated both federally and provincially, and is calculated based on your spouse's net income. The maximum Spouse or common-law partner amount for tax year 2018 is $11,809 (or $13,991 if your spouse/partner is dependent on you because of a physical or mental impairment). The amount you qualify for decreases as your spouse's net income increases. When your spouse's net income is higher than the maximum, you are no longer eligible for this credit. While filing your tax return, if you indicate that you are married but do not enter your spouse's income, TurboTax assumes that your spouse's income is zero, and applies the full credit to your return. But if the amount is incorrect, the CRA will likely locate the error and reassess both your and your spouse's returns. In this case, you would be liable for the balance outstanding, as well as penalty and interest. Whether you file separately or together, your return will be more accurate if you include your spouse’s net income on your tax return. If you don’t know your spouse’s net income, the CRA recommends that you enter your best estimate. Related Information What do I do if I don’t know my spouse... Thu, 10 Sep 2020 10:58:11 GMT https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/why-does-my-spouse-s-income-lower-my-refund-amount/01/873520#M19 TurboTax Support 2020-09-10T10:58:11Z Who can I claim as a dependant? https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/who-can-i-claim-as-a-dependant/01/873521#M18 You can claim any person that depends on you for financial or physical support. The definition of a dependant can change according to different circumstances and tax credits being claimed and can be broad. If you want to know whether your loved one can be considered a dependant, contact the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). Common examples of dependants are: Children or grandchildren – either biological, adopted or stepchildren – under the age of 18 at the end of the year Children 18 years of age and older – either biological, adopted or stepchildren– who have an impairment (or infirmity) in physical or mental functions A spouse who has an impairment (or infirmity) in physical or mental functions A parent or grandparent aged 65 or older, by blood, marriage, common-law partnership or adoption Brothers and sisters through birth, adoption, marriage or common-law partnerships Adult relatives age 18 or older with an impairment in physical or mental functions; this could be parents or grandparents, brothers or sisters – or brothers-in-law or sisters-in-law – aunts or uncles, nieces or nephews You should consider a person as your dependant in the following situations: If there is a tuition transfer from your child or grandchild. The student can be over 18 and does not need to live with yo... Thu, 10 Sep 2020 10:58:12 GMT https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/who-can-i-claim-as-a-dependant/01/873521#M18 TurboTax Support 2020-09-10T10:58:12Z Why isn’t the Canada Child Benefit (CCB) appearing on my return? https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/why-isn-t-the-canada-child-benefit-ccb-appearing-on-my-return/01/873535#M17 The CRA automatically determines your CCB eligibility each year when you file your tax return. The Canada Child Benefit is a non-taxable benefit so do not receive a slip for this income and do not need to enter the benefit amount you received on your tax return. Note: If your marital status has changed, you must notify the CRA, as this can affect your CCB benefits. There are a few things to consider when reviewing your CCB information on TurboTax: Have you entered all of your dependants' information? Select the Dependant button at the top of your screen to open the Dependant Information window. Review the information entered there and revise it, if necessary. All dependant information must be included in this box for the CCB form to be completed. Is the CCB form on your spouse's return? Check to see if the form is completed on your spouse's return. Are you eligible for the CCB? Not everyone is eligible for this benefit; check with the CRA to confirm your eligibility. If you are separated or divorced, it is the guardian primarily responsible for the care and upbringing of the child that is eligible for the CCB. Related information: I didn't receive an RC62 slip. What do I do? More information on the Canada Child Benefit Canada Revenue Agency's Child and Family Benefits Calculator Thu, 10 Sep 2020 10:58:35 GMT https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/why-isn-t-the-canada-child-benefit-ccb-appearing-on-my-return/01/873535#M17 TurboTax Support 2020-09-10T10:58:35Z How much can I claim for child care expenses? https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/how-much-can-i-claim-for-child-care-expenses/01/873542#M16 The annual childcare expense amount maximum is determined by the child's age and physical and mental condition. For tax year 2015 and later, the annual maximum for a child who does not qualify for the disability tax credit is: Children born in 2013 or later: $8,000 per eligible child Children born in 2003 to 2012: $5,000 per eligible child Children born in 2002 or earlier and with a physical or mental infirmity but who do not qualify for the disability tax credit: $5,000 per eligible child For a child who qualifies for the disability tax credit, the annual maximum is: $13,220 for a child of any age Additional credits for Quebec Québec offers an additional tax credit for child care expenses if you meet the eligibility requirements. This is a refundable tax credit that is calculated by multiplying the value of your eligible expenses by the tax credit rate that corresponds to your family income.   The maximum amounts you can claim are: For children with a severe and prolonged impairment in mental or physical functions born in 2013 or later: $13,220 per child For other children, who were born in 2013 or later: $9,660 per child For other children, who were born between 2003 and 2012, or who have a disability: $5,085     Note: Quebec is now returning to the single rate for subsidize... Thu, 10 Sep 2020 10:58:49 GMT https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/how-much-can-i-claim-for-child-care-expenses/01/873542#M16 TurboTax Support 2020-09-10T10:58:49Z Can I claim my payments for provincial health insurance plans for the medical expense tax credit? https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/can-i-claim-my-payments-for-provincial-health-insurance-plans-for-the-medical-expense-tax-credit/01/873573#M15 No, insurance premium payments for a provincial health insurance plan, like BC's Medical Services Plan (MSP) or Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP), are not eligible for claiming a federal or provincial tax deduction unless you are a resident of Québec. Exception for Québec residents: If you live in Québec, you pay an annual premium to the Québec Health Insurance Plan (RAMQ - Régie de l'assurance maladie du Québec) through your tax return. This payment is eligible for tax deductions on both your Québec provincial tax return and your federal tax return. But there is an important difference between how you claim it as a medical expense in your Québec return versus your federal return: Québec tax return: If your 12-month medical expense claim period ends on the last day of a calendar year, claim the premium for RAMQ paid through your Quebéc tax return for that calendar year as a medical expense on same year's Quebéc tax return. For example, if your medical expense claim period ends on December 31, 2018, you need to claim the premium you paid for RAMQ for 2018 as a medical expense on your tax year 2018 Quebéc return. In other words, you pay your RAMQ premium through the same Quebéc tax return on which you also claim it as a medical expense. Additional explanation Since you typica... Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:02:27 GMT https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/can-i-claim-my-payments-for-provincial-health-insurance-plans-for-the-medical-expense-tax-credit/01/873573#M15 TurboTax Support 2020-09-10T11:02:27Z As a married taxpayer, is it better to file my tax return together with my spouse, or separately? https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/as-a-married-taxpayer-is-it-better-to-file-my-tax-return-together-with-my-spouse-or-separately/01/873630#M14 There can be several benefits and detriments in choosing how to file your return as a married taxpayer, but we recommend that you prepare your returns together for the following reasons: The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) requires each taxpayer to file their own return, meaning even if you are married, you must submit your own individual tax return. By preparing a coupled return, two returns will be generated - one for you and one for your spouse - not a single "joint" return. Each return must be submitted to CRA, either through CRA's NETFILE service or by printing and mailing. Note: Whether you prepare separate returns or prepare both returns together in TurboTax, you must declare your spouse’s income. Related information: How do I add my spouse's tax return when preparing my own? Why does my spouse's income lower my return amount? What is the spouse/common-law partner amount? Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:04:16 GMT https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/as-a-married-taxpayer-is-it-better-to-file-my-tax-return-together-with-my-spouse-or-separately/01/873630#M14 TurboTax Support 2020-09-10T11:04:16Z What is the Canada Child Benefit? https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-canada-child-benefit/01/873631#M13 As of July 1, 2016, the Canada Child Benefit (CCB) replaces the universal child care benefit (UCCB) and the Canada child tax benefit (CCTB). The Canada child benefit (CCB) is a tax-free monthly payment for families with children under 18. Its three main components are the basic benefit, the national child benefit, and the child disability benefit, as well as related provincial and territorial programs. The Canada Child Benefit is a non-taxable benefit so, if you're eligible for CCB, you will not receive a slip for this income and do not need to enter the benefit amount you received on your tax return. How does the COVID-19 pandemic affect my benefits? Due to the extended tax filing date, it was announced that eligible Canadians, who are presently receiving the Canada child benefit (CCB) payments, will continue to receive these payments until the end of September 2020. Payment amounts will be based on information from 2018 tax return(s) if their 2019 tax return has not been assessed, and the CRA has not had time to calculate benefits and/or credits for the July to September 2020 payment. You’re still required to file your 2019 income tax return. If the CRA is unable to assess your return by early September 2020, your estimated benefits and/or credits will stop in October 2020 a... Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:04:19 GMT https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-canada-child-benefit/01/873631#M13 TurboTax Support 2020-09-10T11:04:19Z What medical expenses can I claim? https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-medical-expenses-can-i-claim/01/873634#M12 You can claim expenses for various medical products and services, travel expenses for medical treatment, attendant care, expenses for moving to accessible housing, and even premiums you paid to private health services plans. Eligible expenses: To quickly find out whether an expense is eligible, type your expense in the filter items box in the Canada Revenue Agency’s search tool. You can also view a list of common medical expenses and their eligibility. Note: A tax credit is available to you only if the total value of your eligible medical expenses for a specified 12-month period is higher than whichever of the following is the smaller amount: 3% of your net income or $2,302. Supporting documentation: You might need to provide supporting documents and satisfy some conditions to be able to claim certain medical expenses. To find out if there are any requirements to claim a certain medical expense, view CRA’s page with details on medical expenses. Expense claims based on invoice dates: On your tax return, you have the flexibility to choose a claim period for your medical expenses that’s different from the calendar year (Jan 1 – Dec 31). The last day of your chosen 12-month period must fall within the tax year of your tax return. You can claim all eligible medical expenses dated w... Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:04:25 GMT https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-medical-expenses-can-i-claim/01/873634#M12 TurboTax Support 2020-09-10T11:04:25Z What is the Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB)? https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-universal-child-care-benefit-uccb/01/873670#M11 As of July 1, 2016, the Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB) is replaced by the Canada Child Benefit. However, you can still apply for the UCCB for previous years. The UCCB was a taxable benefit paid monthly to families with children under 18 years of age, regardless of income. Before 2015, families received $100 per month for each child between the ages of 0 and 6. After July 2015, families received $160 per month for each child between the ages of 0 and 6, plus $60 per month for each child between the ages of 6 and 17. You were eligible to receive this credit for prior years if: your child was younger than 18 years old; your child lived with you; you were the child's primary caregiver; you were a resident of Canada; and you (or your spouse or common-law partner) were a Canadian citizen, a permanent resident, a protected person, or a temporary resident who has lived in Canada for 18 months or more and has a valid permit on the 19th month (other than one that states "does not confer status"). To apply for prior years, use CRA's My Account or complete and mail form RC66. Note: If you received a back-payment of UCCB for a prior year in current the tax year, the CRA will issue you an RC62 slip. These amounts are entered in the Dependant Summary section of your TurboTax return for ... Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:05:35 GMT https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-universal-child-care-benefit-uccb/01/873670#M11 TurboTax Support 2020-09-10T11:05:35Z What is the Canada child tax benefit (CCTB)? https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-canada-child-tax-benefit-cctb/01/873671#M10 As of July 1, 2016, the Canada child tax benefit (CCTB) has been replaced by the Canada child benefit (CCB). However, you can still apply for the CCTB for previous years. The CCTB was a tax-free monthly payment. It was established to assist lower-income families with children under 18 years of age with child-care expenses. The CCTB may include the national child benefit supplement, the child disability benefit, and any related provincial or territorial programs. How do I know if I'm eligible for the CCTB? You're eligible to receive this credit for prior years if, prior to July 1, 2016: your child was younger than 18 years old; your child lived with you; you were the child's primary caregiver; you were a resident of Canada; and you (or your spouse or common-law partner) were a Canadian citizen, a permanent resident, a protected person, or a temporary resident who has lived in Canada for 18 months or more and who has a valid permit in the 19th month How much am I eligible for? The monthly amount you're eligible for depends on: the number of children in the household who are younger than 18 their ages your adjusted net family income your province or territory of residence your marital status eligibility for the child disability tax benefit How do I apply the CCTB to a prior-year ... Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:05:37 GMT https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-canada-child-tax-benefit-cctb/01/873671#M10 TurboTax Support 2020-09-10T11:05:37Z What is the amount for an eligible dependant? https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-amount-for-an-eligible-dependant/01/873673#M9 The amount for an eligible dependant is a non-refundable tax credit meant to help single adults who are financially responsible for at least one dependant. For tax year 2019, the maximum amount you can claim is $12,069. If you’re claiming the Canada caregiver amount for the same dependant, the maximum amount you can claim is $14,299. The amount of the credit is reduced by your dependant's net income. For example, if your teenager earned $2,000 from a part-time job, $2,000 is deducted from the maximum amount you can claim. Each household can only make one claim, even if there are several dependants in the household. You cannot claim this amount if you are claiming the amount for a spouse or common-law partner. If you qualify for the amount for an eligible dependant, TurboTax automatically calculates the amount for you in your tax return. You can find the calculated amount on your detailed tax summary on the line for the Amount for an eligible dependant. For more information on this line, visit the CRA website. Note: This tax credit is sometimes referred to as the "equivalent to spouse” tax credit, though the CRA does not refer to it in this way. Related information: Who can claim the tax credit for an eligible dependant? What is the family caregiver amount (FCA)? What is the am... Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:05:39 GMT https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-amount-for-an-eligible-dependant/01/873673#M9 TurboTax Support 2020-09-10T11:05:39Z What is the children's fitness tax credit? https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-children-s-fitness-tax-credit/01/873674#M8 Tax year 2016 was the last year to claim this tax credit at the federal level. Tax year 2017 was the last year to claim this tax credit at the provincial level for British Columbia. Manitoba, Québec and Yukon have maintained their equivalent credit for tax year 2018. The children's fitness tax credit was an amount available to parents who enrolled their (or their spouse or common-law partner’s) child in a prescribed physical activity program. 2016 was the last year to claim this tax credit. Eligible costs included registration and membership in sports-related prescribed programs, up to $500 per child for the 2016 tax year. (In previous tax years the maximum allowable amount was $1,000 per child.) To qualify for the credit, the child must have been under 16 years of age at the beginning of the tax year in which you paid the fees (or under 18 years if the child qualifies for the disability tax credit [DTC]). For children who qualified for the DTC, an additional $500 may have been claimed, provided a minimum of $100 of the costs were incurred for membership or registration fees. This credit was refundable for 2015 and 2016, but non-refundable for 2014 and prior years. The CRA website provides further specifics. Related Information Tax Tips: What is the child fitness tax credit? C... Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:05:41 GMT https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-children-s-fitness-tax-credit/01/873674#M8 TurboTax Support 2020-09-10T11:05:41Z What is the children’s arts amount tax credit? https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-children-s-arts-amount-tax-credit/01/873675#M7 Tax year 2016 was the last year to claim this tax credit at the federal level. Tax year 2017 was the last year to claim this tax credit at the provincial level for British Columbia. Manitoba, Québec and Yukon have maintained their equivalent credit for tax year 2018. The children’s arts amount tax credit (CATC) could be claimed by parents who enrolled their (or their spouse or common-law partner’s) child in an arts program. 2016 was the last year to claim this tax credit. Eligible costs included registration and membership fees up to a maximum allowable amount of $250 for each child enrolled in prescribed programs of artistic, cultural, recreational or developmental activity. (In previous tax years the maximum allowable amount was $500 per child.) To qualify for the CATC, the child must have been under 16 years of age at the beginning of the tax year in which you paid the fees (or under 18 years of age if the child is eligible for the disability tax credit [DTC]). Either spouse may have claimed this credit, or it could be split between both parents, to a total credit of $250 for each child. For children who qualified for the DTC, an additional $500 could be claimed, provided a minimum of $100 of the costs were incurred for membership or registration fees. This tax credit was n... Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:05:43 GMT https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-children-s-arts-amount-tax-credit/01/873675#M7 TurboTax Support 2020-09-10T11:05:43Z What is the child care expenses deduction? https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-child-care-expenses-deduction/01/873676#M6 If you (or your spouse or common-law partner) paid others to take care of your children so that you can work, run a business, or attend school, you might be able to deduct the child care expenses to reduce your taxable income. This is called the child care expense deduction. There are some conditions and exceptions you need to know about before you claim this deduction: Age limit: Your child care expenses must be for children who are 15 years of age or younger at some time in the year. Age limit doesn’t apply for children who are mentally or physically infirm and dependent on you. Residency: Expenses must occur while the child was living with you. Paying relatives for childcare: Payments made to a child’s parent, or your spouse or common-law partner, are not deductible. Also, payments made to persons under 18 years of age who are related to you by blood, marriage, common-law partnership, or adoption—such as your brother, sister, brother-in-law, sister-in-law, and you or your spouse or common-law partner's children—are also not deductible. This restriction does not apply to nieces, nephews, aunts, and uncles. Receipt requirement: You need to have a receipt for your expenses. Receipts made to individuals must include their Social Insurance Number (SIN). You don’t have to send in... Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:05:45 GMT https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-child-care-expenses-deduction/01/873676#M6 TurboTax Support 2020-09-10T11:05:45Z Is the Disability Tax Credit transferrable from a dependant? https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/is-the-disability-tax-credit-transferrable-from-a-dependant/01/873677#M5 Yes, under certain conditions, the Disability Tax Credit (DTC) is transferable from a dependant. If you have a dependant person (other than your spouse or common-law partner), who has been approved by the CRA to claim the DTC—but does not need the DTC to reduce their tax liability to zero—then some or all of the amount may be transferred to your tax return. The dependant person: must have been dependent on you for some or all of the basic necessities of life (i.e., food, shelter, clothing) have been resident in Canada at any time during the tax year In addition, one of the following situations must apply: You claimed the amount for an eligible dependant; or The dependant was your or your spouse or common-law partner's parent, grandparent, child, grandchild, brother, sister, aunt, uncle, niece, or nephew, and you claimed either: the amount for infirm dependants age 18 or older; or the Caregiver amount for that dependant (or you could have, if they had zero income and were 18 years of age or older during the tax year). To transfer the DTC, the transferee’s name (i.e. yours), must appear on the dependant person’s DTC certificate. The certificate must have been completed and certified by a medical professional and approved by the CRA. The DTC application process is set out on the ... Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:05:47 GMT https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/is-the-disability-tax-credit-transferrable-from-a-dependant/01/873677#M5 TurboTax Support 2020-09-10T11:05:47Z What is the spouse or common-law partner amount? https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-spouse-or-common-law-partner-amount/01/873714#M4 The spouse or common-law partner amount is a non-refundable tax credit meant to help families living in the same dwelling where one spouse is financially responsible for the other spouse. The maximum amount you can claim for tax year 2019 is $11,809 (or $13,991 if your spouse or common-law partner is eligible for the Canada caregiver amount). You can claim this amount for the entire year, even if you met the eligibility requirements for only part of the year, if: you supported your spouse or common-law partner at any time during the year, and their income was lower than $12,069 (or $14,299 if your spouse or common-law partner was dependent on you because of a mental or physical impairment).   You cannot claim this credit if you're claiming the amount for an eligible dependant.   Note: Special rules apply if you filed for bankruptcy, immigrated to or emigrated from Canada, and if your spouse or common-law partner’s net income is above the threshold because of dividends they received from taxable Canadian corporations during the tax year. Visit the CRA website for more information. If there was a change in your marital status If you and your spouse or common-law partner were separated because of a breakdown in your relationship during the tax year and did not reunite on or befor... Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:09:20 GMT https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-spouse-or-common-law-partner-amount/01/873714#M4 TurboTax Support 2020-09-10T11:09:20Z How do I split the Canada Caregiver Credit (CCC)? https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/how-do-i-split-the-canada-caregiver-credit-ccc/01/873719#M3 Splitting of the Canada Caregiver Credit (called the Family Caregiver Amount for tax years 2016 and earlier) is only available in CD/download editions of TurboTax. Note: You can split the amount you're claiming for other inform dependants age 18 or older. You cannot split the other two amounts that make up the credit (the amount for your spouse/partner/eligible dependant age 18 or older, and the amount for infirm children under 18 years of age). Instructions for splitting the Canada Caregiver Credit Select Forms in the upper-right area of TurboTax if you're not already in Forms mode. Select Forms in the upper-left area of TurboTax. Enter "schedule 5" in the Keyword to search for field in the box that appears. Select Schedule 5 – Details of Dependant from the Forms section, then select OK. Amounts for Spouse or Common-Law Partner and Dependants – Schedule 5 appears. Navigate to the section for the amount you want to split. If you're splitting the Canada Caregiver Credit, scroll to the Canada caregiver amount for other infirm dependants age 18 or older section. If you're splitting the Family Caregiver Amount (tax years 2016 and earlier only), scroll to the Caregiver amount section. Place your cursor at the line labelled Allowable amount for this dependant. Press F2 on your keybo... Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:09:30 GMT https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/how-do-i-split-the-canada-caregiver-credit-ccc/01/873719#M3 TurboTax Support 2020-09-10T11:09:30Z What is the Disability Tax Credit? https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-disability-tax-credit/01/873722#M2 The Disability Tax Credit (DTC) is a non-refundable credit designed to help people with disabilities (or their caretakers), cope with disability-related expenses by reducing the amount of income tax they are required to pay. In order to qualify for the credit, the DTC application (T2201), must be completed and certified by a medical professional, then approved by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). Those who qualify for the DTC may also qualify for other credits, such as the Canada Caregiver Amount. Claiming the Disability Tax Credit in TurboTax Related information: How do I claim the disability tax credit? Canadian Disability Tax Credits A guide to the Disability Tax Credit Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:09:37 GMT https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-disability-tax-credit/01/873722#M2 TurboTax Support 2020-09-10T11:09:37Z What is my marital status according to the CRA? https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-my-marital-status-according-to-the-cra/01/873766#M1 The Canada Revenue Agency’s idea of your marital status might differ from how you see it. When entering your marital status in TurboTax, make sure your entry matches CRA’s definition. This is how CRA understands the various marital statuses: Married: You’re legally married. Common-law: You live with a person with whom you have a conjugal relationship and at least one of the following conditions is met: You’ve lived with the person in a conjugal relationship for at least 12 consecutive months; The person is the parent of your child by birth or legal adoption; or The person has custody and control of your child (or did immediately before the child turned 19), and your child is wholly dependent on that person for support (i.e., your child does not depend on you for support). Widowed: Your spouse died and you have not remarried or entered into a common-law relationship. Divorced: You are legally divorced and you have not remarried or entered into a common-law relationship. Separated: You’re legally married but you’ve been living apart from your spouse for any period of time due to a breakdown in the relationship. You were living common-law but you’ve been living apart from your partner for at least 90 consecutive days due to a breakdown in the relationship. Alternatively, you may ... Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:10:49 GMT https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-my-marital-status-according-to-the-cra/01/873766#M1 TurboTax Support 2020-09-10T11:10:49Z
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<channel>
<title>Family and health topics</title>
<link>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/02/168
</link>
<description>Family and health topics</description>
<pubDate>Wed, 30 Sep 2020 17:39:39 GMT</pubDate>
<dc:creator>168</dc:creator>
<dc:date>2020-09-30T17:39:39Z</dc:date>
<item>
<title>
Can I claim my spouse or common-law partner as my dependent?
</title>
<link>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/can-i-claim-my-spouse-or-common-law-partner-as-my-dependent/01/873442#M25
</link>
<description>
Your spouse or common-law partner cannot be claimed as your dependent. However, if you supported your spouse or common-law partner at any time during the year, and they have a low income, you may be able to claim the Spouse or common-law partner (SCP) amount. &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; TurboTax automatically calculates the SCP when you enter your marital status and complete your spouse’s personal information section. &nbsp; &nbsp; &nbsp; Unused tax credits from the lower income spouse may also be transferred to the other if needed to reduce taxes. The CRA website provides more information. Related information: What do I do if I don't know my spouse's income? I’m separated or divorced. Why am I being asked for info about my former spouse/partner? How do I change my marital status in online editions of TurboTax? Why won’t TurboTax let me change my marital status to single? Frequently asked questions about marital status and filing your taxes
</description>
<pubDate>Thu, 10 Sep 2020 10:55:49 GMT</pubDate>
<guid>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/can-i-claim-my-spouse-or-common-law-partner-as-my-dependent/01/873442#M25
</guid>
<dc:creator>TurboTax Support</dc:creator>
<dc:date>2020-09-10T10:55:49Z</dc:date>
</item>
<item>
<title>
Can I claim the eligible dependant credit for more than one child?
</title>
<link>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/can-i-claim-the-eligible-dependant-credit-for-more-than-one-child/01/873486#M24
</link>
<description>
No. The tax credit for an eligible dependant can only be claimed once. Each household is allowed only one claim for this amount, even if there is more than one dependant in the household. You should enter all your children and other dependants when preparing your tax return to claim other dependant benefits that may be available. Related information Who can claim the tax credit for an eligible dependant?
</description>
<pubDate>Thu, 10 Sep 2020 10:57:18 GMT</pubDate>
<guid>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/can-i-claim-the-eligible-dependant-credit-for-more-than-one-child/01/873486#M24
</guid>
<dc:creator>TurboTax Support</dc:creator>
<dc:date>2020-09-10T10:57:18Z</dc:date>
</item>
<item>
<title>What is the Family Caregiver Amount?</title>
<link>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-family-caregiver-amount/01/873490#M23
</link>
<description>
As of tax year 2017, Canada Revenue Agency has discontinued the Family Caregiver Amount (FCA) as a separate credit on your tax return. Instead, you can claim the Canada Caregiver Credit (CCC), a new credit that consolidates the Caregiver Amount, the Amount for Infirm Dependants 18 and older, and the Family Caregiver Amount. However, you can still claim the Family Caregiver Amount on previous years’ tax returns. For tax year 2016 and earlier, the FCA is a non-refundable tax credit you can claim if you cared for a dependant with an impairment in physical or mental functions. The dependant must have lived with you in order to be eligible. You can claim one FCA for each eligible dependant. Eligibility criteria vary based on the dependant’s age: To claim the FCA for dependants over 18, you must also be claiming at least one of the following credits on the same return: Spouse or common-law partner amount Amount for an eligible dependent Caregiver Amount You can claim the FCA for dependants under 18 as a stand-alone credit. The child’s impairment must be prolonged and indefinite, and the child must have been dependent on you for assistance with personal needs and care as compared to children of the same age. Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) may require you to provide a signed statement fr...
</description>
<pubDate>Thu, 10 Sep 2020 10:57:24 GMT</pubDate>
<guid>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-family-caregiver-amount/01/873490#M23
</guid>
<dc:creator>TurboTax Support</dc:creator>
<dc:date>2020-09-10T10:57:24Z</dc:date>
</item>
<item>
<title>
How does my income affect how much I can deduct for medical expenses?
</title>
<link>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/how-does-my-income-affect-how-much-i-can-deduct-for-medical-expenses/01/873498#M22
</link>
<description>
Your&nbsp;net&nbsp;income—not your total gross income—affects the amount of medical expenses&nbsp;you can claim as a credit. You can claim the total amount of eligible medical expenses minus $2,352* or 3% of your net income, whichever amount is smaller. For example: Your net income is $25,000 for the year. Your medical expenses add up to $840. You can claim $840 minus $2,352 or 3% of your net income, whichever amount is smaller. 3% of your net income ($25,000) is $750. This amount is smaller than $2,352 so this is the amount we’ll use for our calculations. So you can claim $840 - $750 = $90 as a credit. If your total medical expenses are less than 3% of your net income, they can’t be applied as credits. Note: Only expenses, or portions of expenses, that haven’t been reimbursed to you can be included as medical expenses for income tax purposes. *This amount is for the 2019 tax year.&nbsp; Related information How do I enter my medical expenses? What medical expenses can I claim? How do I choose a claim period for medical expenses? Eligible medical expenses you can claim on your tax return (source: CRA)
</description>
<pubDate>Thu, 10 Sep 2020 10:57:35 GMT</pubDate>
<guid>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/how-does-my-income-affect-how-much-i-can-deduct-for-medical-expenses/01/873498#M22
</guid>
<dc:creator>TurboTax Support</dc:creator>
<dc:date>2020-09-10T10:57:35Z</dc:date>
</item>
<item>
<title>
Can I claim medical expenses that I paid for a dependant who is not my minor child?
</title>
<link>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/can-i-claim-medical-expenses-that-i-paid-for-a-dependant-who-is-not-my-minor-child/01/873508#M21
</link>
<description>
Yes. You can claim eligible medical expenses that you paid for your or your spouse/partner's child over 18, parent, grandparent, brother, sister, aunt, uncle, niece, or nephew. In order to be eligible, the dependant must have depended on you for support and lived with you during the tax year, or have been a resident of Canada during the tax year. The residency condition does not apply if the dependant was your or your spouse or common-law partner's child or grandchild. Related Information What medical expenses can I claim? Where do I enter my medical expenses? Where do I enter medical expenses for dependants over 18 years of age?
</description>
<pubDate>Thu, 10 Sep 2020 10:57:54 GMT</pubDate>
<guid>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/can-i-claim-medical-expenses-that-i-paid-for-a-dependant-who-is-not-my-minor-child/01/873508#M21
</guid>
<dc:creator>TurboTax Support</dc:creator>
<dc:date>2020-09-10T10:57:54Z</dc:date>
</item>
<item>
<title>Can I claim prior year medical expenses?</title>
<link>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/can-i-claim-prior-year-medical-expenses/01/873510#M20
</link>
<description>
Yes, you can claim any eligible medical expenses if they occurred in a 12-month period that ends in the current tax year. After you enter your medical expenses, TurboTax will prompt you to choose your 12-month claim period. For example, the oldest medical expense that you can claim on your 2018 return is an expense from January 2, 2017, using a claim period of January 2, 2017, to January 1, 2018. If you have a large amount of expenses in the latter part of the tax year, it might be better to save them and claim them with medical expenses you have in the early part of the following tax year. For example, if most of your medical expenses occurred after May 15, 2018, you can save them for your 2019 tax return. At that time you can use a 12-month period of May 15, 2018 to May 14, 2019, and claim all expenses that fall within that period. You can use a different 12-month period each year; your 12-month period doesn’t have to start where your previous 12-month period ended. However, you cannot claim the same expenses more than once. Related Information How do I choose a claim period for medical expenses?
</description>
<pubDate>Thu, 10 Sep 2020 10:57:57 GMT</pubDate>
<guid>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/can-i-claim-prior-year-medical-expenses/01/873510#M20
</guid>
<dc:creator>TurboTax Support</dc:creator>
<dc:date>2020-09-10T10:57:57Z</dc:date>
</item>
<item>
<title>
Why does my spouse's income lower my refund amount?
</title>
<link>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/why-does-my-spouse-s-income-lower-my-refund-amount/01/873520#M19
</link>
<description>
Your refund likely dropped due to the calculation of the Spouse or common-law partner amount. The&nbsp;Spouse or common-law partner amount&nbsp;is calculated both federally and provincially, and is calculated based on your spouse's net income. The maximum Spouse or common-law partner amount for tax year 2018 is $11,809 (or $13,991 if your spouse/partner is dependent on you because of a physical or mental impairment). The amount you qualify for decreases as your spouse's net income increases. When your spouse's net income is higher than the maximum, you are no longer eligible for this credit. While filing your tax return, if you indicate that you are married but do not enter your spouse's income, TurboTax assumes that your spouse's income is zero, and applies the full credit to your return. But if the amount is incorrect, the CRA will likely locate the error and reassess both your and your spouse's returns. In this case, you would be liable for the balance outstanding, as well as penalty and interest. Whether you file separately or together, your return will be more accurate if you include your spouse’s net income on your tax return. If you don’t know your spouse’s net income, the CRA recommends that you enter your best estimate. Related Information What do I do if I don’t know my spouse...
</description>
<pubDate>Thu, 10 Sep 2020 10:58:11 GMT</pubDate>
<guid>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/why-does-my-spouse-s-income-lower-my-refund-amount/01/873520#M19
</guid>
<dc:creator>TurboTax Support</dc:creator>
<dc:date>2020-09-10T10:58:11Z</dc:date>
</item>
<item>
<title>Who can I claim as a dependant?</title>
<link>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/who-can-i-claim-as-a-dependant/01/873521#M18
</link>
<description>
You can claim any person that depends on you for financial or physical support. The definition of a dependant can change according to different circumstances and tax credits being claimed and can be broad. If you want to know whether your loved one can be considered a dependant, contact the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). Common examples of dependants are: Children or grandchildren – either biological, adopted or stepchildren – under the age of 18 at the end of the year Children 18 years of age and older – either biological, adopted or stepchildren– who have an impairment (or infirmity) in physical or mental functions A spouse who has an impairment (or infirmity) in physical or mental functions A parent or grandparent aged 65 or older, by blood, marriage, common-law partnership or adoption Brothers and sisters through birth, adoption, marriage or common-law partnerships Adult relatives age 18 or older with an impairment in physical or mental functions; this could be parents or grandparents, brothers or sisters – or brothers-in-law or sisters-in-law – aunts or uncles, nieces or nephews You should consider a person as your dependant in the following situations: If there is a tuition transfer from your child or grandchild. The student can be over 18 and does not need to live with yo...
</description>
<pubDate>Thu, 10 Sep 2020 10:58:12 GMT</pubDate>
<guid>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/who-can-i-claim-as-a-dependant/01/873521#M18
</guid>
<dc:creator>TurboTax Support</dc:creator>
<dc:date>2020-09-10T10:58:12Z</dc:date>
</item>
<item>
<title>
Why isn’t the Canada Child Benefit (CCB) appearing on my return?
</title>
<link>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/why-isn-t-the-canada-child-benefit-ccb-appearing-on-my-return/01/873535#M17
</link>
<description>
The CRA automatically determines your CCB eligibility each year when you file your tax return. The Canada Child Benefit is a non-taxable benefit so do not receive a slip for this income and do not need to enter the benefit amount you received on your tax return. Note: If your marital status has changed, you must notify the CRA, as this can affect your CCB benefits. There are a few things to consider when reviewing your CCB information on TurboTax: Have you entered all of your dependants' information? Select the Dependant button at the top of your screen to open the Dependant Information window. Review the information entered there and revise it, if necessary. All dependant information must be included in this box for the CCB form to be completed. Is the CCB form on your spouse's return? Check to see if the form is completed on your spouse's return. Are you eligible for the CCB? Not everyone is eligible for this benefit; check with the CRA to confirm your eligibility. If you are separated or divorced, it is the guardian primarily responsible for the care and upbringing of the child that is eligible for the CCB. Related information: I didn't receive an RC62 slip. What do I do? More information on the Canada Child Benefit Canada Revenue Agency's Child and Family Benefits Calculator
</description>
<pubDate>Thu, 10 Sep 2020 10:58:35 GMT</pubDate>
<guid>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/why-isn-t-the-canada-child-benefit-ccb-appearing-on-my-return/01/873535#M17
</guid>
<dc:creator>TurboTax Support</dc:creator>
<dc:date>2020-09-10T10:58:35Z</dc:date>
</item>
<item>
<title>How much can I claim for child care expenses?</title>
<link>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/how-much-can-i-claim-for-child-care-expenses/01/873542#M16
</link>
<description>
The annual childcare expense amount maximum is determined by the child's age and physical and mental condition. For tax year 2015 and later, the annual maximum for a child&nbsp;who does not qualify for the disability tax credit is: Children born in 2013 or later: $8,000 per eligible child Children born in 2003 to 2012: $5,000 per eligible child Children born in 2002 or earlier and with a physical or mental infirmity but who do not qualify for the disability tax credit: $5,000 per eligible child For a child&nbsp;who qualifies for the disability tax credit, the annual maximum is: $13,220 for a child of any age Additional credits for Quebec Québec offers an additional tax credit for child care expenses if you meet the eligibility requirements. This is a refundable tax credit that is calculated by multiplying the value of your eligible expenses by the tax credit rate that corresponds to your family income. &nbsp; The maximum amounts you can claim are: For children with a severe and prolonged impairment in mental or physical functions born in 2013 or later: $13,220 per child For other children, who were born in 2013 or later: $9,660 per child For other children, who were born between 2003 and 2012, or who have a disability: $5,085 &nbsp; &nbsp; Note: Quebec is now returning to the single rate for subsidize...
</description>
<pubDate>Thu, 10 Sep 2020 10:58:49 GMT</pubDate>
<guid>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/how-much-can-i-claim-for-child-care-expenses/01/873542#M16
</guid>
<dc:creator>TurboTax Support</dc:creator>
<dc:date>2020-09-10T10:58:49Z</dc:date>
</item>
<item>
<title>
Can I claim my payments for provincial health insurance plans for the medical expense tax credit?
</title>
<link>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/can-i-claim-my-payments-for-provincial-health-insurance-plans-for-the-medical-expense-tax-credit/01/873573#M15
</link>
<description>
No, insurance premium payments for a provincial health insurance plan, like BC's Medical Services Plan (MSP) or Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP), are not eligible for claiming a federal or provincial tax deduction unless you are a resident of Québec. Exception for Québec residents: If you live in Québec, you pay an annual premium to the Québec Health Insurance Plan (RAMQ - Régie de l'assurance maladie du Québec) through your tax return. This payment is eligible for tax deductions on both your Québec provincial tax return and your federal tax return. But there is an important difference between how you claim it as a medical expense in your Québec return versus your federal return: Québec tax return: If your 12-month medical expense claim period ends on the last day of a calendar year, claim the premium for RAMQ paid through your Quebéc tax return for that calendar year as a medical expense on same year's Quebéc tax return. For example, if your medical expense claim period ends on December 31, 2018, you need to claim the premium you paid for RAMQ for 2018 as a medical expense on your tax year 2018 Quebéc return. In other words, you pay your RAMQ premium through the same Quebéc tax return on which you also claim it as a medical expense. Additional explanation Since you typica...
</description>
<pubDate>Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:02:27 GMT</pubDate>
<guid>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/can-i-claim-my-payments-for-provincial-health-insurance-plans-for-the-medical-expense-tax-credit/01/873573#M15
</guid>
<dc:creator>TurboTax Support</dc:creator>
<dc:date>2020-09-10T11:02:27Z</dc:date>
</item>
<item>
<title>
As a married taxpayer, is it better to file my tax return together with my spouse, or separately?
</title>
<link>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/as-a-married-taxpayer-is-it-better-to-file-my-tax-return-together-with-my-spouse-or-separately/01/873630#M14
</link>
<description>
There can be several benefits and detriments in choosing how to file your return as a married taxpayer, but we recommend that you prepare your returns together for the following reasons: The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) requires each taxpayer to file their own return, meaning even if you are married, you must submit your own individual tax return. By preparing a coupled return, two returns will be generated - one for you and one for your spouse - not a single "joint" return. Each return must be submitted to CRA, either through CRA's NETFILE service&nbsp;or by printing and mailing. Note:&nbsp;Whether you prepare separate returns or prepare both returns together in TurboTax, you must declare your spouse’s income. Related information: How do I add my spouse's tax return when preparing my own? Why does my spouse's income lower my return amount? What is the spouse/common-law partner amount?
</description>
<pubDate>Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:04:16 GMT</pubDate>
<guid>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/as-a-married-taxpayer-is-it-better-to-file-my-tax-return-together-with-my-spouse-or-separately/01/873630#M14
</guid>
<dc:creator>TurboTax Support</dc:creator>
<dc:date>2020-09-10T11:04:16Z</dc:date>
</item>
<item>
<title>What is the Canada Child Benefit?</title>
<link>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-canada-child-benefit/01/873631#M13
</link>
<description>
As of July 1, 2016, the Canada Child Benefit (CCB) replaces the universal child care benefit (UCCB) and the Canada child tax benefit (CCTB). The Canada child benefit (CCB) is a tax-free monthly payment for families with children under 18. Its three main components are the basic benefit, the national child benefit, and the child disability benefit, as well as related provincial and territorial programs. The Canada Child Benefit is a non-taxable benefit so, if you're eligible for CCB, you will not receive a slip for this income and do not need to enter the benefit amount you received on your tax return. How does the COVID-19 pandemic affect my benefits? Due to the extended tax filing date, it was announced that eligible Canadians, who are presently receiving the Canada child benefit (CCB) payments, will continue to receive these payments until the end of September 2020. Payment amounts will be based on information from 2018 tax return(s) if their 2019 tax return has not been assessed, and the CRA has not had time to calculate benefits and/or credits for the July to September 2020 payment. You’re still required to file your 2019 income tax return. If the CRA is unable to assess your return by early September 2020, your estimated benefits and/or credits will stop in October 2020 a...
</description>
<pubDate>Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:04:19 GMT</pubDate>
<guid>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-canada-child-benefit/01/873631#M13
</guid>
<dc:creator>TurboTax Support</dc:creator>
<dc:date>2020-09-10T11:04:19Z</dc:date>
</item>
<item>
<title>What medical expenses can I claim?</title>
<link>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-medical-expenses-can-i-claim/01/873634#M12
</link>
<description>
You can claim expenses for various medical products and services, travel expenses for medical treatment, attendant care, expenses for moving to accessible housing, and even premiums you paid to private health services plans. Eligible expenses: To quickly find out whether an expense is eligible,&nbsp;type your expense in the filter items box in the Canada Revenue Agency’s search tool. You can also view a list of common medical expenses and their eligibility. Note: A tax credit is available to you only if the&nbsp;total value of your eligible medical expenses for a specified 12-month period is higher than whichever of the following is the smaller amount: 3% of your net income or $2,302. Supporting documentation: You might need to provide supporting documents and satisfy some conditions to be able to claim certain medical expenses. To find out if there are any requirements to claim a certain medical expense,&nbsp;view CRA’s page with details on medical expenses. Expense claims based on invoice dates: On your tax return, you have the flexibility to&nbsp;choose a claim period for your medical expenses that’s&nbsp;different&nbsp;from the calendar year (Jan 1 – Dec 31). The last day of your chosen 12-month period must fall within the tax year of your tax return. You can claim all eligible medical expenses dated w...
</description>
<pubDate>Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:04:25 GMT</pubDate>
<guid>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-medical-expenses-can-i-claim/01/873634#M12
</guid>
<dc:creator>TurboTax Support</dc:creator>
<dc:date>2020-09-10T11:04:25Z</dc:date>
</item>
<item>
<title>What is the Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB)?</title>
<link>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-universal-child-care-benefit-uccb/01/873670#M11
</link>
<description>
As of July 1, 2016, the Universal Child Care Benefit (UCCB) is replaced by the Canada Child Benefit.&nbsp;However, you can still apply for the UCCB for previous years. The UCCB was a taxable benefit paid monthly to families with children under 18 years of age, regardless of income. Before 2015, families received $100 per month for each child between the ages of 0 and 6. After July 2015, families received $160 per month for each child between the ages of 0 and 6, plus $60 per month for each child between the ages of 6 and 17. You were eligible to receive this credit for prior years if: your child was younger than 18 years old; your child lived with you; you were the child's primary caregiver; you were a resident of Canada; and you (or your spouse or common-law partner) were a Canadian citizen, a permanent resident, a protected person, or a temporary resident who has lived in Canada for 18 months or more and has a valid permit on the 19th month (other than one that states "does not confer status"). To apply for prior years, use CRA's My Account or complete and mail form RC66. Note: If you received a back-payment of UCCB for a prior year in current the tax year, the CRA will issue you an RC62 slip. These amounts are entered in the Dependant Summary section of your TurboTax return for ...
</description>
<pubDate>Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:05:35 GMT</pubDate>
<guid>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-universal-child-care-benefit-uccb/01/873670#M11
</guid>
<dc:creator>TurboTax Support</dc:creator>
<dc:date>2020-09-10T11:05:35Z</dc:date>
</item>
<item>
<title>What is the Canada child tax benefit (CCTB)?</title>
<link>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-canada-child-tax-benefit-cctb/01/873671#M10
</link>
<description>
As of July 1, 2016, the Canada child tax benefit (CCTB) has been replaced by the Canada child benefit (CCB).&nbsp;However, you can still apply for the CCTB for previous years. The CCTB was a tax-free monthly payment. It was established to assist lower-income families with children under 18 years of age with child-care expenses. The CCTB may include the national child benefit supplement, the child disability benefit, and any related provincial or territorial programs. How do I know if I'm eligible for the CCTB? You're eligible to receive this credit for prior years if, prior to July 1, 2016: your child was younger than 18 years old; your child lived with you; you were the child's primary caregiver; you were a resident of Canada; and you (or your spouse or common-law partner) were a Canadian citizen, a permanent resident, a protected person, or a temporary resident who has lived in Canada for 18 months or more and who has a valid permit in the 19th month How much am I eligible for? The monthly amount you're eligible for depends on: the number of children in the household who are younger than 18 their ages your adjusted net family income your province or territory of residence your marital status eligibility for the child disability tax benefit How do I apply the CCTB to a prior-year ...
</description>
<pubDate>Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:05:37 GMT</pubDate>
<guid>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-canada-child-tax-benefit-cctb/01/873671#M10
</guid>
<dc:creator>TurboTax Support</dc:creator>
<dc:date>2020-09-10T11:05:37Z</dc:date>
</item>
<item>
<title>What is the amount for an eligible dependant?</title>
<link>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-amount-for-an-eligible-dependant/01/873673#M9
</link>
<description>
The amount for an eligible dependant is a non-refundable tax credit meant to help single adults who are financially responsible for at least one dependant. For tax year 2019, the maximum amount you can claim is $12,069. If you’re claiming the Canada caregiver amount for the same dependant, the maximum amount you can claim is $14,299. The amount of the credit is reduced by your dependant's net income. For example, if your teenager earned $2,000 from a part-time job, $2,000 is deducted from the maximum amount you can claim. Each household can only make one claim, even if there are several dependants in the household. You cannot claim this amount if you are claiming the amount for a spouse or common-law partner. If you qualify for the amount for an eligible dependant, TurboTax automatically calculates the amount for you in your tax return. You can find the calculated amount on your detailed tax summary on the line for the Amount for an eligible dependant. For more information on this line, visit the CRA website. Note:&nbsp;This tax credit is sometimes referred to as the "equivalent to spouse” tax credit, though the CRA does not refer to it in this way. Related information: Who can claim the tax credit for an eligible dependant? What is the family caregiver amount (FCA)? What is the am...
</description>
<pubDate>Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:05:39 GMT</pubDate>
<guid>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-amount-for-an-eligible-dependant/01/873673#M9
</guid>
<dc:creator>TurboTax Support</dc:creator>
<dc:date>2020-09-10T11:05:39Z</dc:date>
</item>
<item>
<title>What is the children's fitness tax credit?</title>
<link>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-children-s-fitness-tax-credit/01/873674#M8
</link>
<description>
Tax year 2016 was the last year to claim this tax credit at the federal level. Tax year 2017 was the last year to claim this tax credit at the provincial level for&nbsp;British Columbia. Manitoba, Québec and Yukon have maintained their equivalent credit for tax year 2018. The children's fitness tax credit was an amount available to parents who enrolled their (or their spouse or common-law partner’s) child in a prescribed physical activity program. 2016 was the last year to claim this tax credit. Eligible costs included registration and membership in sports-related prescribed programs, up to $500 per child for the 2016 tax year. (In previous tax years the maximum allowable amount was $1,000 per child.) To qualify for the credit, the child must have been under 16 years of age at the beginning of the tax year in which you paid the fees (or under 18 years if the child qualifies for the disability tax credit [DTC]). For children who qualified for the DTC, an additional $500 may have been claimed, provided a minimum of $100 of the costs were incurred for membership or registration fees. This credit was refundable for 2015 and 2016, but non-refundable for 2014 and prior years. The CRA website provides further specifics. Related Information Tax Tips: What is the child fitness tax credit? C...
</description>
<pubDate>Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:05:41 GMT</pubDate>
<guid>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-children-s-fitness-tax-credit/01/873674#M8
</guid>
<dc:creator>TurboTax Support</dc:creator>
<dc:date>2020-09-10T11:05:41Z</dc:date>
</item>
<item>
<title>What is the children’s arts amount tax credit?</title>
<link>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-children-s-arts-amount-tax-credit/01/873675#M7
</link>
<description>
Tax year 2016 was the last year to claim this tax credit at the federal level. Tax year 2017 was the last year to claim this tax credit at the provincial level for&nbsp;British Columbia. Manitoba, Québec and Yukon have maintained their equivalent credit for tax year 2018. The children’s arts amount tax credit (CATC) could be claimed by parents who enrolled their (or their spouse or common-law partner’s) child in an arts program. 2016 was the last year to claim this tax credit. Eligible costs included registration and membership fees up to a maximum allowable amount of $250 for each child enrolled in prescribed programs of artistic, cultural, recreational or developmental activity. (In previous tax years the maximum allowable amount was $500 per child.) To qualify for the CATC, the child must have been under 16 years of age at the beginning of the tax year in which you paid the fees (or under 18 years of age if the child is eligible for the disability tax credit [DTC]). Either spouse may have claimed this credit, or it could be split between both parents, to a total credit of $250 for each child. For children who qualified for the DTC, an additional $500 could be claimed, provided a minimum of $100 of the costs were incurred for membership or registration fees. This tax credit was n...
</description>
<pubDate>Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:05:43 GMT</pubDate>
<guid>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-children-s-arts-amount-tax-credit/01/873675#M7
</guid>
<dc:creator>TurboTax Support</dc:creator>
<dc:date>2020-09-10T11:05:43Z</dc:date>
</item>
<item>
<title>What is the child care expenses deduction?</title>
<link>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-child-care-expenses-deduction/01/873676#M6
</link>
<description>
If you (or your spouse or common-law partner) paid others to take care of your children so that you can work, run a business, or attend school, you might be able to deduct the child care expenses to reduce your taxable income. This is called the child care expense deduction. There are some conditions and exceptions you need to know about before you claim this deduction: Age limit: Your child care expenses must be for children who are 15 years of age or younger at some time in the year. Age limit doesn’t apply for children who are mentally or physically infirm and dependent on you. Residency: Expenses must occur while the child was living with you. Paying relatives for childcare: Payments made to a child’s parent, or your spouse or common-law partner, are not deductible. Also, payments made to persons under 18 years of age who are related to you by blood, marriage, common-law partnership, or adoption—such as your brother, sister, brother-in-law, sister-in-law, and you or your spouse or common-law partner's children—are also not deductible. This restriction does not apply to nieces, nephews, aunts, and uncles. Receipt requirement: You need to have a receipt for your expenses. Receipts made to individuals must include their Social Insurance Number (SIN). You don’t have to send in...
</description>
<pubDate>Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:05:45 GMT</pubDate>
<guid>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-child-care-expenses-deduction/01/873676#M6
</guid>
<dc:creator>TurboTax Support</dc:creator>
<dc:date>2020-09-10T11:05:45Z</dc:date>
</item>
<item>
<title>
Is the Disability Tax Credit transferrable from a dependant?
</title>
<link>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/is-the-disability-tax-credit-transferrable-from-a-dependant/01/873677#M5
</link>
<description>
Yes, under certain conditions, the Disability Tax Credit (DTC) is transferable from a dependant. If you have a dependant person (other than your spouse or common-law partner), who has been approved by the CRA to claim the DTC—but does not need the DTC to reduce their tax liability to zero—then some or all of the amount may be transferred to your tax return. The dependant person: must have been dependent on you for some or all of the basic necessities of life (i.e., food, shelter, clothing) have been resident in Canada at any time during the tax year In addition, one of the following situations must apply: You claimed the amount for an eligible dependant; or The dependant was your or your spouse or common-law partner's parent, grandparent, child, grandchild, brother, sister, aunt, uncle, niece, or nephew, and you claimed either: the amount for infirm dependants age 18 or older; or the Caregiver amount for that dependant (or you could have, if they had zero income and were 18 years of age or older during the tax year). To transfer the DTC, the transferee’s name (i.e. yours), must appear on the dependant person’s DTC certificate. The certificate must have been completed and certified by a medical professional and approved by the CRA. The DTC application process is set out on the ...
</description>
<pubDate>Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:05:47 GMT</pubDate>
<guid>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/is-the-disability-tax-credit-transferrable-from-a-dependant/01/873677#M5
</guid>
<dc:creator>TurboTax Support</dc:creator>
<dc:date>2020-09-10T11:05:47Z</dc:date>
</item>
<item>
<title>What is the spouse or common-law partner amount?</title>
<link>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-spouse-or-common-law-partner-amount/01/873714#M4
</link>
<description>
The spouse or common-law partner amount is a non-refundable tax credit meant to help families living in the same dwelling where one spouse is financially responsible for the other spouse.&nbsp;The maximum amount you can claim for tax year 2019 is $11,809 (or $13,991 if your spouse or common-law partner is eligible for the Canada caregiver amount). You can claim this amount&nbsp;for the entire year, even if you met the eligibility requirements for only part of the year, if: you supported your spouse or common-law&nbsp;partner at any time during the year,&nbsp;and their income was lower than $12,069 (or $14,299 if your spouse or common-law partner was dependent on you because of a mental or physical impairment). &nbsp; You cannot claim this credit if you're claiming the amount for an eligible dependant. &nbsp; Note:&nbsp;Special rules apply if you filed for bankruptcy, immigrated to or emigrated from Canada, and if your spouse or common-law partner’s net income is above the threshold because of dividends they received from taxable Canadian corporations during the tax year. Visit the CRA website for more information. If there was a change in your marital status If you and your spouse or common-law partner were separated because of a breakdown in your relationship during the tax year and did not reunite on or befor...
</description>
<pubDate>Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:09:20 GMT</pubDate>
<guid>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-spouse-or-common-law-partner-amount/01/873714#M4
</guid>
<dc:creator>TurboTax Support</dc:creator>
<dc:date>2020-09-10T11:09:20Z</dc:date>
</item>
<item>
<title>How do I split the Canada Caregiver Credit (CCC)?</title>
<link>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/how-do-i-split-the-canada-caregiver-credit-ccc/01/873719#M3
</link>
<description>
Splitting of the Canada Caregiver Credit (called the Family Caregiver Amount for tax years 2016 and earlier) is only available in&nbsp;CD/download editions of TurboTax. Note:&nbsp;You can split the amount you're claiming for other inform dependants age 18 or older. You cannot split the other two amounts that make up the credit (the amount for your spouse/partner/eligible dependant age 18 or older, and the amount for infirm children under 18 years of age). Instructions for splitting the Canada Caregiver Credit Select&nbsp;Forms in the upper-right area of TurboTax if you're not already in Forms mode. Select&nbsp;Forms in the upper-left area of TurboTax. Enter "schedule 5" in the Keyword to search for field in the box that appears. Select&nbsp;Schedule 5 – Details of Dependant from the Forms section, then select OK. Amounts for Spouse or Common-Law Partner and Dependants – Schedule 5 appears. Navigate to the section for the amount you want to split. If you're splitting the Canada Caregiver Credit, scroll to the Canada caregiver amount for other infirm dependants age 18 or older section. If you're splitting the Family Caregiver Amount (tax years 2016 and earlier only), scroll to the Caregiver amount section. Place your cursor at the line labelled&nbsp;Allowable amount for this dependant. Press&nbsp;F2 on your keybo...
</description>
<pubDate>Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:09:30 GMT</pubDate>
<guid>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/how-do-i-split-the-canada-caregiver-credit-ccc/01/873719#M3
</guid>
<dc:creator>TurboTax Support</dc:creator>
<dc:date>2020-09-10T11:09:30Z</dc:date>
</item>
<item>
<title>What is the Disability Tax Credit?</title>
<link>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-disability-tax-credit/01/873722#M2
</link>
<description>
The Disability Tax Credit (DTC) is a non-refundable credit designed to help people with disabilities (or their caretakers), cope with disability-related expenses by reducing the amount of income tax they are required to pay. In order to qualify for the credit, the DTC application (T2201), must be completed and certified by a medical professional, then approved by the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA). Those who qualify for the DTC may also qualify for other credits, such as the Canada Caregiver Amount. Claiming the Disability Tax Credit in TurboTax Related information: How do I claim the disability tax credit? Canadian Disability Tax Credits A guide to the Disability Tax Credit
</description>
<pubDate>Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:09:37 GMT</pubDate>
<guid>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-the-disability-tax-credit/01/873722#M2
</guid>
<dc:creator>TurboTax Support</dc:creator>
<dc:date>2020-09-10T11:09:37Z</dc:date>
</item>
<item>
<title>What is my marital status according to the CRA?</title>
<link>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-my-marital-status-according-to-the-cra/01/873766#M1
</link>
<description>
The Canada Revenue Agency’s idea of your marital status might differ from how you see it. When entering your marital status in TurboTax, make sure your entry matches CRA’s definition. This is how CRA understands the various marital statuses: Married: You’re legally married. Common-law: You live with a person with whom you have a conjugal relationship and at least one of the following conditions is met: You’ve lived with the person in a conjugal relationship for at least 12 consecutive months; The person is the parent of your child by birth or legal adoption; or The person has custody and control of your child (or did immediately before the child turned 19), and your child is wholly dependent on that person for support (i.e., your child does not depend on you for support). Widowed: Your spouse died and you have not remarried or entered into a common-law relationship. Divorced: You are legally divorced and you have not remarried or entered into a common-law relationship. Separated: You’re legally married but you’ve been living apart from your spouse for any period of time due to a breakdown in the relationship. You were living common-law but you’ve been living apart from your partner for at least 90 consecutive days due to a breakdown in the relationship. Alternatively, you may ...
</description>
<pubDate>Thu, 10 Sep 2020 11:10:49 GMT</pubDate>
<guid>
https://turbotax.community.intuit.ca/community/family-health/help/what-is-my-marital-status-according-to-the-cra/01/873766#M1
</guid>
<dc:creator>TurboTax Support</dc:creator>
<dc:date>2020-09-10T11:10:49Z</dc:date>
</item>
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</rss>