Solved: I am a full time employee, and have done some myst...

Why sign in to the Community?

  • Submit a question
  • Check your notifications
or and start working on your taxes
EnglishEN

Pick a language

Français English
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Highlighted
New Member

I am a full time employee, and have done some mystery shopping jobs on the side. What kind of log or proof should I be keeping for mileage expense?

For mystery shopping is this considered self employed? Do I need to do anything else other than keep a log of mileage? I am assuming I am able to claim mileage?
1 Best answer

Accepted Solutions
Highlighted
New Member

I am a full time employee, and have done some mystery shopping jobs on the side. What kind of log or proof should I be keeping for mileage expense?

Yes it is self-employment.  You cannot claim mileage, per se, but you can claim a portion of fuel receipts, car insurance and repairs.  You do have to be careful, in that you cannot count the mileage driving to the job, as it is considered driving to work, which is not deductible, but you can count the mileage driving from one retail outlet to another. You can kind of get around this rule if you have enough income to absorb a home office expense deduction.

All you really need is a calendar on which to write the mileage driven on each day you worked as a mystery shopper. You need the starting mileage on the car for the year and  the ending mileage in order to calculate the actual percentage used for business.  That determines how much of your vehicle expenses are deductible.

View solution in original post

2 Replies
Highlighted
New Member

I am a full time employee, and have done some mystery shopping jobs on the side. What kind of log or proof should I be keeping for mileage expense?

Yes it is self-employment.  You cannot claim mileage, per se, but you can claim a portion of fuel receipts, car insurance and repairs.  You do have to be careful, in that you cannot count the mileage driving to the job, as it is considered driving to work, which is not deductible, but you can count the mileage driving from one retail outlet to another. You can kind of get around this rule if you have enough income to absorb a home office expense deduction.

All you really need is a calendar on which to write the mileage driven on each day you worked as a mystery shopper. You need the starting mileage on the car for the year and  the ending mileage in order to calculate the actual percentage used for business.  That determines how much of your vehicle expenses are deductible.

View solution in original post

Highlighted
Level 6

I am a full time employee, and have done some mystery shopping jobs on the side. What kind of log or proof should I be keeping for mileage expense?

Thank you for using Intuit turbotax Live Community

Whether or not you are an employee or self-employed depends on the relationship between you and the person who pays you. You should check with the payer to see if they will be issuing a slip such as a T4 or a T4A.

 The Canada Revenue Agency (CRA) needs detailed records of expenses paid and a record of work trips.  CRA has documentation on their website regarding vehicle records:

https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/tax/businesses/topics/sole-proprietorships-partners...

Hope this helps

v