I paid for my adult sons medically necessary rehab (doctors letter). He is independent now but could not work without it. Can I claim it as a medical expense?

My adult son needed drug and alcohol rehab which I paid for. He could not work without it and had a doctors note to get into a rehab clinic. He did not and still does not live with me but could not work any longer without the treatment. I do not know if he qualifies as a dependent or if I can claim the $15,000 in fees as medical expenses on my 2017 taxes?

Answer

The cost of the rehab clinic can be claimed as a medical expense if you have a medical practitioner certify in writing that the person needs the specialized equipment, facilities, or staff.

https://www.canada.ca/en/revenue-agency/services/tax/individuals/topics/about-your-tax-return/tax-re...

 

Can your son be considered a dependent? Here is some information on who you can claim as a dependant:

You can claim any person that depends on you for financial or physical support. The definition of a dependant can change according to different circumstances and tax credits being claimed and can be broad.

If you want to know whether your loved one can be considered a dependant, contact the Canada Revenue Agency (CRA).

Common examples of dependants are:

  • Children or grandchildren – either biological, adopted or stepchildren – under the age of 18 at the end of the year
  • Children 18 years of age and older – either biological, adopted or stepchildren– who have an impairment (or infirmity) in physical or mental functions
  • A spouse who has an impairment (or infirmity) in physical or mental functions
  • A parent or grandparent aged 65 or older, by blood, marriage, common-law partnership or adoption
  • Brothers and sisters through birth, adoption, marriage or common-law partnerships
  • Adult relatives age 18 or older with an impairment in physical or mental functions; this could be parents or grandparents, brothers or sisters – or brothers-in-law or sisters-in-law – aunts or uncles, nieces or nephews

You should consider a person as your dependant in the following situations:

  • If there is a tuition transfer from your child or grandchild. The student can be over 18 and does not need to live with you.
  • If there is an infirm amount transfer from your child or grandchild. The child does not need to live with you.

Important: Claiming a person as a dependant does not mean they don't file their own income tax return. Everyone who earns income needs to file a personal tax return, even when someone else (for example, a parent or grandparent) claims them as a dependant. Even if the dependant has no income, they are still eligible for certain credits, such as GST/HST or other federal or provincial credits.

Learn more about who are considered dependants.

See a full list of articles offering Helpful Tax Information About Dependant-Related Expenses.

 

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Here is how to enter medical expenses for dependants over 18 years of age:

First, if you haven’t already:

Enter your dependant's information, including their net income. TurboTax uses this information to calculate the amount you can claim.

Separate the medical expenses you paid for this dependant from medical expenses you paid for yourself, your spouse/partner, and your minor children. Medical expenses you paid for a dependant over 18 years of age should be calculated and entered separately. (Otherwise, the amount you can claim will be reduced by 3% of your income instead of theirs).

Choose a method for entering the expenses and perform any necessary calculations. CRA allows you to enter your expenses in one of two ways:

  • Simplified method: You can do this in one of two ways:
    • As a total for the year: Add up all the eligible medical expenses for this dependant for your 12-month claim period and enter the amount as one expense. (Do not include expenses paid for disability supports, van adaptation, moving expenses, and private medical plans. These will be entered separately.)
    • By category: Sort the medical expenses into categories (such as medications; travel; devices; etc.). Add the eligible amounts in each category and enter each category’s amount as an expense.
  • Detailed method: Enter each receipt individually, as a separate expense.

However you choose to enter your expenses, CRA requires you to keep your receipts for at least six years.

 

Next, enter the expenses:

If you're using an online edition of TurboTax:

1. From the top of your screen, select Deductions > Medical Expenses Profile.

2. On the Your Medical Profile step, select You paid medical expenses for a dependant (other than your spouse or children under 18 years of age), and then select Continue.

3. On the Medical Expense For Other Dependants step, select your dependant from the drop-down list and enter your expenses using the method of your choice. (Your dependant will be listed here only if you entered them in the Setting Up step of TurboTax.)

  • Depending on how you’re entering your expenses:
    • As a total for the year: Enter the date of your most recent receipt for this dependant and the total amount you paid for them for the year.
    • By category/type of expense: Enter information about each type of expense in a separate column. At Payment date, enter the date of your most recent receipt for that type of expense. At Amount, enter the total amount you paid for that category. If you have additional types of expenses, enter them in the second and third columns. You can enter up to three categories using this method.
    • Each receipt individually: Enter each receipt in a separate column. You can enter up to three receipts using this method.

4. At Do you wish to claim the medical expense for other dependants:

  • Select Yes to claim the expenses.
  • Select No to carry the expenses forward to a future year.

5. Select Continue.

If you're using the CD/download edition of TurboTax:

1. From the left-side menu, select DEDUCTIONS & CREDITS > Medical expenses profile.

2. On the Your medical profile step:

  • Select Medical Receipts and You paid medical expenses for a dependant (other than your spouse or children under 18 years of age).
  • If you have private medical plan, moving, van adaptation, attendant care or nursing home costs for your dependant, select Private medical plans and other claims.
  • Select Continue.

3. On the first Medical Expenses step, select Enter Expenses.

4. On the second Medical Expenses step, enter your expenses using the method of your choice. Depending on how you’re entering your expenses:

  • As a total for the year: At Date, enter the date of your most recent receipt for your dependant. At Amount, enter the total eligible expenses for your dependant.
  • By category/type of expense: At Date, enter the date of your most recent receipt for that type of expense. At Amount, enter the eligible amount you calculated for that type of expense.
  • Each receipt individually: Enter the information from your receipt.

5. Select Enter Expenses to enter an additional expense.

6. Select Done once you’ve entered all the expenses.

7. On the Medical expense summary step, select Done With Medical Expenses.

8. On the Medical expense claim step, set your 12-month claim period, and then select Continue.

9. If applicable, on the Private Medical Plans and Other Claims step, enter your private medical plan, moving, van adaptation, attendant care, and nursing home expenses.

10. On the Dependant Medical Expense step, enter the total you paid for each dependant over 18 years of age, and then select Continue.

 

 

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