I separated in December from spouse-I do not have his sin and income they are asking how do I bypass this

The system will not let me advance until I fill in my ex spouses SIN and his income for last year. We are separated and do not speak so it is impossible for me to get this info-what do I do?

Answer

If you separated or divorced in 2018, the CRA will still require your spouse’s information.

If you separated or divorced before 2018, you say "No" to the question "Did you separate from your spouse/partner in 2018?".

To make changes, select “Marital Status” from under “Setting Up/Introduction” in the left side menu. Choose the correct options and click the “Continue” button to save your information.

If you can’t see “Setting Up” (or there are locks next to everything), use the “Back” button at the bottom of the page to go backwards through the interview until you get to the “What's your marital status?” page.

I’m separated or divorced. Why am I being asked for info about my former spouse/partner?

If your marital status changed from married or common-law to separated or divorced during the tax year: You’re still required to enter some information about your former spouse to complete your return and assess your eligibility for certain credits. The change may not affect your bottom line, but it’s required to complete your return.

 

If you didn’t separate or get divorced during the tax year: Follow the instructions below and TurboTax won’t ask you questions about your spouse.

 

 

Instructions for the TurboTax online edition

1. Select the image of the magnifying glass (or Find) in the upper-right area of TurboTax.

2. Enter “marital status” in the Find window.

3. Select Marital Status from the list of results, and then select Go.

The What’s your marital status? step appears.

4. Select the answer to On December 31, 20xx, you were (where "20xx” is the tax year).

5. Select No where it says Did you separate from your spouse/partner in 20xx? (where “xx” is the tax year).

6. Select Continue.

 

Instructions for the TurboTax CD/download edition

1. Select the image of the magnifying glass (or Find) in the upper-right area of TurboTax.

2. Enter “marital status” in the Find window.

3. Select Marital status changes since December 31 from the list of results, and then select Go.

The Marital status changes since December 31 step appears.

4. Select No in answer to the question Did you marry, become common-law, divorce, become widowed, or separate from your spouse or common-law partner since December 31, 20xx? (where “20xx” is the year before the tax year).

 

 

 

Related information



p_cg_tto_us_lc_na_question:L9arxCD2G_CA_en_CA

What to do if you don’t know your (ex)spouse’s income?

When you don’t know your spouse’s income and can’t find out through reasonable means, the CRA recommends that you enter your best estimate.

  • The CRA will assess your and your spouse’s (or former spouse’s) returns together to ensure that credits and deductions were correctly applied between you. If there’s any inaccuracy or mismatch, they’ll reassess your returns.
  • Tip: You may want to save your tax refund (if any) until you receive your Notice of Assessment or Reassessment in case some or all of it needs to be repaid.

 

Important: If you don’t enter your spouse’s income (or an estimate), it’s important that you do not claim the Spousal Amount.

To avoid claiming the Spousal Amount, follow the instructions below.

 

 

Instructions for the TurboTax online edition

1. Select the image of the magnifying glass (or Find) in the upper-right area of TurboTax.

2. Enter “information” in the Find window.

3. Select Information About Your Spouse or Common-Law Partner from the list of results, and then select Go.

The Now, let’s get [name’s] information step appears.

4. Fill out the form in TurboTax.

5. Select Continue.

The Tell us more about [name] step appears.

6. Follow the instruction below that matches your situation.

  • If your spouse’s net income is more than $1, select No where it says Was [name’s] net income for 20xx zero? Then enter “$25,000” where it says Net income from [name]’s 20xx federal tax return.
  • If your spouse’s net income is $1 or less, select Yes where it says Was [name’s] net income for 20xx zero?

Note: Entering $25,000 won’t affect the outcome of your return; it simply makes you ineligible for the Spousal Amount.

7. Select No where it says Are you claiming the spousal amount?

8. Fill out the rest of the form in TurboTax.

9. Select Continue.

 

 

Instructions for the TurboTax CD/download edition

1. On the left-hand navigation menu, select Introduction to open/expand it (unless it's already open), and then select Name, Info about your spouse or partner from the menu.

The Information about your spouse or common-law partner step appears.

2. Enter “$25,000” where it says Their net income for 20xx (where “20xx” is the tax year).

3. Select Check this box if you don’t know your spouse/partner’s net income.

4. Select No, I know that I am not eligible to claim the spousal amount where it says Do you want TurboTax to calculate whether you are eligible for a full or partial spousal amount credit?

5. Fill out the rest of the form in TurboTax.

6. Select Continue.

 

 

 

 

Note: Whether you enter an amount for your spouse’s income or not, you should complete the rest of the information on your spouse to the best of your ability, especially if you have dependants. The CRA relies on this information to ensure that both you and your spouse are compliant in claiming dependant credits.

 

 

 

Related information

 


HOW14551
p_cg_tto_us_lc_na_question:L9GXDe1K0_CA_en_CA


Was this answer helpful? Yes No
Original
TurboTaxSusan , Moderator
Moderator

No answers have been posted

More Actions

People come to TurboTax AnswerXchange for help and answers—we want to let them know that we're here to listen and share our knowledge. We do that with the style and format of our responses. Here are five guidelines:

  1. Keep it conversational. When answering questions, write like you speak. Imagine you're explaining something to a trusted friend, using simple, everyday language. Avoid jargon and technical terms when possible. When no other word will do, explain technical terms in plain English.
  2. Be clear and state the answer right up front. Ask yourself what specific information the person really needs and then provide it. Stick to the topic and avoid unnecessary details. Break information down into a numbered or bulleted list and highlight the most important details in bold.
  3. Be concise. Aim for no more than two short sentences in a paragraph, and try to keep paragraphs to two lines. A wall of text can look intimidating and many won't read it, so break it up. It's okay to link to other resources for more details, but avoid giving answers that contain little more than a link.
  4. Be a good listener. When people post very general questions, take a second to try to understand what they're really looking for. Then, provide a response that guides them to the best possible outcome.
  5. Be encouraging and positive. Look for ways to eliminate uncertainty by anticipating people's concerns. Make it apparent that we really like helping them achieve positive outcomes.

Select a file to attach:

Do you still have a question?

Ask your question to the community. Most questions get a response in about a day.

Post your question to the community